Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

C003/9967 Rights Managed

Request low-res file

530 pixels on longest edge, unwatermarked

Request/Download high-res file

Uncompressed file size: 32.1MB

Downloadable file size: 1.9MB

Price image Pricing

Please login to use the price calculator


Credit: STUART WILSON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) inhabit dry, rocky, shrub-covered terrain where they can conceal themselves inside crevices in the rocks or in mouse holes. These snakes have a plump body, short tail and a broad triangular head. Like all pit vipers, it has a pit organ, which is situated in an indentation of the upper jaw, between the nostril and eye. The pit is about 5 mm deep, with an outer and inner chamber separated by a thin membrane. The membrane senses very slight temperature differences between the snake's inner and ambient temperatures.

Release details: Model release not required. Property release not required.

Keywords: animal, animals, arizona snake, crotalidae, crotalus, crotalus atrox, defensive behavior, desert fauna, diamondback, diamondback rattlesnake, fauna, herp, herps, north american, pit viper, pit vipers, poisonous, rattle, rattler, rattlesnake, rattling, reptile, reptilia, shaking rattle, snake, snakes, sonoran desert, squamata, texas diamond-back, thermoregulation, threat display, venomous, venomous pitviper species, viper, viperidae, western diamondback rattlesnake, wildlife

Licence fees: A licence fee will be charged for any media (low or high resolution) used in your project.