Greenwich and Paris Meridians, 1799

Greenwich and Paris Meridians, 1799

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Credit: ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Greenwich and Paris Meridians. Map showing the triangulation triangles connecting the Greenwich and Paris Meridians, allowing maps constructed under the rival systems to be compared. Large theodolites were used to take measurements across the Channel. The French continued to use the Paris Meridian for several decades after the Greenwich Meridian was adopted internationally in 1884. This work was first published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, then in volume one of a 1799 report by Mudge and Dalby for the UK's Board of Ordnance. This would later form the basis of the UK national mapping agency, the Ordnance Survey.

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