Wet end dewatering in a papermaking machine

Wet end dewatering in a papermaking machine

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Credit: GEOFF TOMPKINSON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: MODEL RELEASED. Paper making. A papermill worker observes the wet end dewatering process in coloured paper manufacture. In the paper making process paper pulp is made by adding water to a raw material (usually cellulosic wood chips). The pulp is then mechanically worked up into its individual fibres. The fibres can then be dyed (optional) and thinly spread on to a level belt (top). The belt then passes through several rollers to squeeze out the water. The water drains off (bottom right) and rejoins the paper pulp. This is to salvage stray fibres. After further chemical treatment the paper is pressed into sheets and dried.

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Keywords: coloured paper, dewatering, industrial, industry, manufacture, paper machine, paper mill, wet end, worker

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