Magic lantern display, 17th century

Magic lantern display, 17th century

C016/8932 Rights Managed

Request low-res file

530 pixels on longest edge, unwatermarked

Request/Download high-res file

Uncompressed file size: 50.0MB

Downloadable file size: 6.0MB

Price image Pricing

Please login to use the price calculator


Credit: SCIENCE, INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS LIBRARY/NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY/ SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Magic lantern display. 17th-century artwork showing an image of a skeleton being projected from a magic lantern. The magic lantern was the ancestor of the modern slide projector. It was invented in China in the second century, and was in existence in Europe by the late 17th century. It used an oil lamp and a lens to project images painted on glass plates onto a screen. Artwork from the 1671 edition of 'Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae' (The Great Art of Light and Darkness) by the German Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher (circa 1601-1680). First published in 1646, it was mostly about optics and magic lanterns.

Release details: Model release not required. Property release not required.

Keywords: 1600s, 1646, 1671, 17th century, ars magna, ars magna lucis et umbrae, artwork, athanasius kircher, device, display, displaying, early, equipment, european, german, historical, history, illustration, jesuit, magia catoptrica, magic lantern, magic lanterns, monochrome, optics, physical, physics, pioneering, project, projecting, projection room, projector, skeleton, slide projector, technological, technology

Licence fees: A licence fee will be charged for any media (low or high resolution) used in your project.