Veterinarians Theiler and Mohler in 1923

Veterinarians Theiler and Mohler in 1923

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Credit: LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

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Caption: Veterinarians Theiler and Mohler in 1923. Swiss-South African veterinarian Arnold Theiler (left, 1867-1936) and US veterinarian John Robbins Mohler (right, 1875-1952). Theiler, born in Switzerland, pioneered veterinary science in South Africa. He worked on vaccines for smallpox and rinderpest. He also described Theiler's disease, a hepatitis (viral disease of the liver) that affects horses. Mohler worked on diseases such as Texas Fever, a viral disease of cattle, and dourine, a parasitic disease of horses. Photographed on 1 October 1923. This photograph is from the National Photo Company Collection, consisting mostly of photographs taken in Washington DC, USA.

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