Spectral charts, 19th century

Spectral charts, 19th century

C020/7384 Rights Managed

Request low-res file

530 pixels on longest edge, unwatermarked

Request/Download high-res file

Uncompressed file size: 57.7MB

Downloadable file size: 2.7MB

Price image Pricing

Please login to use the price calculator


Credit: KING'S COLLEGE LONDON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Spectral charts. 19th-century charts of prismatic spectra for various media. These experiments were carried out by British mathematician Baden Powell (1796-1860). Down left is the angle of deviation, from 15 to 34 degrees. The materials are: caissia oil, carbon disulphide, aragonite, calcite, flint glass, topaz, rock salt, creosote, anise oil, crown glass, quartz, sassafras oil, turpentine, sulphuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, soda, potassium, pyroligneous acid, alcohol, and water. These charts are from a collection of Powell's works on optics: 'A general and elementary view of the undulatory theory, as applied to the dispersion of light' (1841).

Release details: Model release not required. Property release not required.

Keywords: 1800s, 1841, 19th century, alcohol, angle of deviation, angles, anise oil, aragonite, artwork, baden powell, book, british, caissia oil, calc spar, calc-spar, calcite, carbon disulphide, comparing, comparison, creosote, crown glass, diagram, dispersion of light, elementary, english, european, flint glass, general, historical, history, hydrochloric acid, illustration, journals, kreosote, materials, materials science, media, minerals, muriatic acid, nitric acid, no-one, nobody, oils, optical, optics, page, philosophical transactions, physical, physics, potassium, prismatic spectra, publication, pyroligneous acid, quartz, rock salt, sassafras oil, soda, sodium chloride, spectral chart, spectral charts, spectrum, sulphuret of carbon, sulphuric acid, topaz, turpentine, undulatory theory, water, wave theory, wood alcohol

Licence fees: A licence fee will be charged for any media (low or high resolution) used in your project.