Edmond Halley, English astronomer

Edmond Halley, English astronomer

C021/5652 Rights Managed

Request low-res file

530 pixels on longest edge, unwatermarked

Request/Download high-res file

Uncompressed file size: 25.0MB

Downloadable file size: 2.5MB

Price image Pricing

Please login to use the price calculator


Credit: GREGORY TOBIAS/CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions: This image may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by the Chemical Heritage Foundation of any product, service or activity, or to concur with an opinion or confirm the accuracy of any text appearing alongside or in logical association with the image.

Caption: Edmond Halley (1656-1742), English astronomer. Halley deduced that the comets seen in 1456, 1531, 1607 and 1682 were the same object (Halley's Comet), successfully predicting its return in 1758. In 1718 he observed the proper motion of the stars. He was clerk and editor for the Royal Society. He devised the first diving bell, mapped the Earth's winds, constructed mortality tables, and linked the aurora borealis with the Earth's magnetic field. He was Astronomer Royal (1720-42), and Savilian Professor of Geometry at the University of Oxford (1704-42). This engraving by John Faber (1690-1756) is after Thomas Murray (1663-1734).

Release details: Model release not required. Property release not required.

Keywords: 1600s, 1700s, 17th century, 18th century, adult, artwork, astronomer, astronomer royal, astronomical, astronomus regius, astronomy, black-and-white, caucasian, comet halley, cometary, comets, discoverer, edmond halley, edmundus halleius, english, european, geographer, geographical, geography, geometriae professor savilianus, halley's comet, historical, history, human, illustration, john faber, male, man, mathematical, mathematics, meteorological, meteorologist, meteorology, monochrome, oval, people, person, portrait, savilian professor of geometry, scientist, thomas murray, university of oxford, weather

Licence fees: A licence fee will be charged for any media (low or high resolution) used in your project.