Credit: FRANCIS LEROY & OLIVIER WAUTIER, BIOCOSMOS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Immunoglobulin A (IgA), animation. IgA is produced by plasma cells, or plasmocytes, a type of B lymphocyte white blood cell. It is a Y-shaped molecule, that is often secreted as a dimer (two molecules joined together, red). IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin in mucosal linings, including those of the intestine. After it is secreted, IgA attaches to a polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (blue) on the surface of a mucosal tissue epithelial cell (brown cube) and is transported into the cell via endocytosis. The receptor-IgA complex travels through the cell before being secreted through the luminal surface of the epithelial cell. In the lumen it binds to the mucous layer where it protects against pathogens. Part of the receptor remains attached to the IgA. This is known as the secretory component and protects IgA from being degraded by enzymes.

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Keywords: animated, animation, antibodies, antibody, b cell, b lymphocyte, biological, biology, black background, dimer, dimeric, epithelial cell, epithelium, immune system, immunoglobulin a, immunological, immunology, label, labeled, labelled, labels, mucosal immunity, mucous, mucus, plasma cell, plasmocyte, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, secretory component, secretory iga, siga, text, transcytosis, white blood cell

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Immunoglobulin A, animation

K004/3640 Rights Managed

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Duration: 00:00:31.24

Frame size: 1920x1080

Frame rate: 25

Audio: No

Format: QuickTime, Photo JPEG 100%, progressive scan, square pixels

File size: 270.7M

Original

Capture format: QuickTime Animation

Codec: Animation

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