Solar prominence and Earth, artwork

Solar prominence and Earth, artwork

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Credit: Hale Observatories, courtesy EMILIO SEGRE VISUAL ARCHIVES/AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions: Editorial use only

Caption: Solar prominence and Earth. 19th-century artwork of a solar prominence compared in size to the Earth. A solar prominence is an eruption of ionized plasma at a much cooler temperature than that found in the corona, the Sun's atmosphere. This makes the prominence visible as a darker feature as it erupts from the layer of the Sun known as the photosphere. The Earth has a diameter of 12,756 kilometres. The Sun (curved limb at bottom) has a diameter of over 1.3 million kilometres. This drawing, obtained from visual observation, was made by British astronomer Sir Robert Stawell Ball (1840-1913) and published in 'The Story of the Sun' (1893).

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Keywords: 1800s, 1893, 19th century, artwork, astronomical, astronomy, astrophysical, astrophysics, black-and-white, book, comparing, comparison, earth, erupting, eruption, historical, history, illustration, ionised, ionized, large, monochrome, no-one, nobody, photosphere, physical, physics, planet, plasma, publication, relative size, research, robert stawell ball, scale, size, small, solar, solar limb, solar prominence, solar system, space, sun, the story of the sun

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