Eilhard Mitscherlich, German chemist

Eilhard Mitscherlich, German chemist

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Credit: CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

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Caption: Eilhard Mitscherlich (1794-1863), German chemist. In 1818, Mitscherlich went to Berlin to work under Link analysing crystals. He developed the theory of isomorphism (that compounds crystallising in similar structures have similar compositions). Mitscherlich was then given a grant allowing him to study in Stockholm. On his return, he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Royal University of Berlin. Elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (1828), he was awarded its Royal Medal (1829). He published 'Lehrbuch der Chemie' (Textbook of Chemistry, 1829-30). Drawn by l'Alemand, engraved by William Carvosso Sharpe (1839-1924).

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