Flagellants, Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493

Flagellants, Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493

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Caption: Woodcut of flagellants (CCXV recto) excerpt from english translation The sect of the Flagellants had its origin in Italy; and from there permeated into Germany and France. They whipped themselves with scourges provided with knots and barbs. Out of this practice originated many errors of faith and in the sacrament. To some extent this sect was finally exterminated by fire and sword. The Nuremberg Chronicle is an illustrated Biblical paraphrase and world history that follows the story of human history related in the Bible; it includes the histories of a number of important Western cities. Written in Latin by Hartmann Schedel, with a version in German translation by Georg Alt, it appeared in 1493. It is one of the best documented early printed book, an incunabulum, and one of the first to successfully integrate illustrations and text. In the Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, the revelation which John receives is that of the

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