Micro black hole experiment in CERN's CMS detector

Micro black hole experiment in CERN's CMS detector

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Credit: CERN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions: Editorial use only. This image may not be used to state or imply endorsement by CERN of any product, activity or service

Caption: Micro black hole experiment in CERN's CMS detector. Computer-generated graphic of the results of an experiment to detect microscopic black holes. This high-multiplicity collision event contains 12 jets with energies of 50 GeV and an overall mass energy of 6.4 TeV. The collision was observed in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory. The presence of micro black holes can be deduced from the particles produced as they decay (evaporate) to produced the tracks shown here. The concept of black hole evaporation and micro black holes was put forward in the 1970s by British physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018). This experiment took place on 28 September 2015.

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Keywords: 2015, 21st century, 28 september 2015, artwork, astronomical, astronomy, astrophysical, astrophysics, atlas, black background, cern, cms, collider, collision, compact muon solenoid, cosmological, cosmology, decay, detector, europe, european, evaporating, evaporation, experiment, graphic, hawking radiation, high energies, illustration, lab, laboratory, large hadron collider, lhc, micro black hole, no-one, nobody, particle collision, particle physics, particles, physical, physics, quantum effect, quantum mechanics, stephen hawking, swiss, switzerland, track, tracks

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