George Church, US geneticist

George Church, US geneticist

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Caption: George Church (born 1954), US geneticist, looking at a a 'Polonator' DNA sequencer. Church is Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, USA. He is a pioneer of analytical and computational techniques in genetics. In 1984 he co-initiated the Human Genome Project, an international effort to map the human genome. He also invented the concepts of molecular multiplexing and tags, homologous recombination methods, array DNA synthesizers and automated sequencing. In 2005 he founded the biotechnology firm LS9, which uses synthetic biology to engineer bacteria that produce novel hydrocarbon fuels. In 2006, Church founded the Personal Genome Project, a project designed to make personal genome sequencing affordable for the general public. Photographed in 2008.

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