This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Dr. Andrew Ure(1778-1857)

Dr. Andrew Ure(1778-1857)

C005/6535

Rights Managed

This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

SHEILA TERRY / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY SHEILA TERRY / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Dr, Andrew Ure conducting voltaic experiments on the body of the executed murderer, Clydesdale, in 1818. A large audience assembled in the Anatomy Theatre of the University of Glasgow to witness the spectacle. Ure used a Voltaic pile to electrically stimulate various muscles of the body in an attempt to revive the corpse. Here he is shown stimulating the supraorbital nerve causing Clydesdale's face to show a range of fearsome expressions.This caused one gentleman to faint and a number to flee. No bleeding occurred from cuts in the body proving that Clydesdale was dead and could not be resuscitated. In 1830 Ure moved to London and became involved in the early development of forensic science. Questions raised by the Galvanization of corpses inspired Mary Shelley to write her novel Frankenstein.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Add to board
  • Similar {{ mediaType(i) }}