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Pterosaur forelimb comparison, artwork

Pterosaur forelimb comparison, artwork

E446/0657

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Credit

JOHN CONWAY / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY JOHN CONWAY / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Pterosaur forelimb comparison. Artwork showing the ventral forelimb bone structure (top to bottom) of a crocodylian, a pterosaur (Anhanguera sp.) and a corvid (crow family). Muscle attachment sites (dark grey and blue) on the pterosaur bones are inferred from fossil muscle scars and comparison with crocdylians and birds. Pterosaurs are an extinct group of flying reptiles that lived from the Late Triassic to the Late Cretaceous (228-65 million years ago). They had small, fur covered bodies, hollow bones and large wings made of skin and muscle, that extended from the thorax to the end of an extended fourth 'finger'. The muscle attachment sites imply that pterosaurs used a flapping motion to power their flight.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

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