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Illustration of rods and cones in the retina

Illustration of rods and cones in the retina

P424/0059

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Credit

JOHN BAVOSI / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY JOHN BAVOSI / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Illustration of rods and a cone in the retina. The retina, inside the eye, contains a light-sensitive membranous layer of cells. These are specialized nerve cells: elongated rods and cone-tipped cells, that produce vision. The rods are very sensitive and respond to dim light. With them the eye can detect images. While the cones are less sensitive but responsible for colour vision. These cells lie embedded between Muller cells, and protrude above at the white wavy line (centre). Rods and cones each have a nucleus (here, coloured green), below which the cells synapse with a nerve network (at bottom). Nerve impulses stimulated by light pass into this nerve network, to the brain.

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