This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Optical CCD image of the double quasar 0957+561

Optical CCD image of the double quasar 0957+561

R932/0024

Rights Managed

This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

DR RUDOLPH SCHILD / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY DR RUDOLPH SCHILD / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Optical CCD image of "double quasar" 0957+561. The quasar is a single object 10 million light years away. It is seen as two images (outlined in box, with enlargement inset) because its light is bent when it passes close to an intervening galaxy (not visible) which acts as a "gravitational lens". The 1979 discovery of 0957+561, the first double quasar found, confirmed the predicted bend- ing of light by gravity in Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. The 3 bright spots are fore- ground stars in our own galaxy. The image was made by a CCD (Charge Coupled Device) camera mounted on a telescope at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Add to board
  • Similar {{ mediaType(i) }}