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First whole body X-ray, 1897

First whole body X-ray, 1897

V800/0008

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Credit

SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

First whole body X-ray (1907). The first whole body radiograph ever taken of a living person, a woman in 1897. The X-ray was made from a single exposure by William Morton of New York. Standing with her head in profile, her skeleton, heart and liver are seen. Her jewellery is highly visible: hatpin, necklace, bracelet, rings. On her feet she is wearing high button boots with nailed-on heels, and around her hips and abdomen a whalebone corset. To make this X-ray, Morton included a 12 inch induction coil with the current supplied from a New York street mains connection. A Crookes' tube was positioned 54 inches from the X-ray plate and the time taken was about 30 minutes.

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