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The first X-ray crystal diffraction photo

The first X-ray crystal diffraction photo

V800/0023

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Credit

SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

First X-ray diffraction photograph. The first ever X-ray crystal diffraction photograph made in 1912. The German physicist Max von Laue believed that X-rays were electromagnetic waves of a very short wavelength. To prove this, it was necessary to diffract X-rays with a very fine grating. The diffraction pattern would then be developed on a photographic medium. Von Laue first thought of using the lattice structure of crystals as a grating. A copper sulphate crystal was used as the grating. The pattern of spots on the developed photograph proved von Laue's idea.

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