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Moth camouflage

Moth camouflage

Z355/0585

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Credit

MICHAEL W. TWEEDIE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY MICHAEL W. TWEEDIE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Moth camouflage. Two colours of peppered moth (Biston betularia) on the bark of a tree. These two forms, light (lower left) and dark (upper centre), are a famous example of natural selection. The light coloured form of the moth is most common in nature, providing camouflage, as here, on lichen-covered tree bark. In 1840s England, industrial pollution turned trees a sooty black. The darker moth (occurring as a genetic mutation) was better camouflaged on sooty trees, and within 50 years became the commonest form. The light moth was seen and preyed upon by birds. See image Z355/586 for the moths on a dark background.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

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