This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Lord Rayleigh discovering argon, 1894

Lord Rayleigh discovering argon, 1894

C013/5252

Rights Managed

25.0 MB (2.3 MB compressed)

2312 x 3780 pixels

19.6 x 32.0 cm ⏐ 7.7 x 12.6 in (300dpi)

This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

GREGORY TOBIAS / CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY GREGORY TOBIAS / CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions:

This image may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by the Science History Institute of any product, service or activity, or to concur with an opinion or confirm the accuracy of any text appearing alongside or in logical association with the image.

Caption

Lord Rayleigh working with argon, as depicted in a caricature published in the British weekly magazine Vanity Fair in 1899. John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh (1842-1919), was an English physicist. In 1894, with Scottish chemist William Ramsay, he isolated the noble gas argon from the air, an achievement for which he was awarded the 1904 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strutt also discovered the optical phenomenon now called Rayleigh scattering. This phenomenon explains the diffuse sky radiation that causes the sky's blue colour. From 1905 to 1908 he served as President of the Royal Society. Artwork by F. T. Dalton ('FTD').

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Add to board
  • Similar {{ mediaType(i) }}