This image is not available for purchase in your country.

William Crookes and vacuum tube, 1903

William Crookes and vacuum tube, 1903

C013/5253

Rights Managed

25.1 MB (1.9 MB compressed)

2276 x 3850 pixels

19.3 x 32.5 cm ⏐ 7.6 x 12.8 in (300dpi)

This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

GREGORY TOBIAS / CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY GREGORY TOBIAS / CHEMICAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions:

This image may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by the Science History Institute of any product, service or activity, or to concur with an opinion or confirm the accuracy of any text appearing alongside or in logical association with the image.

Caption

William Crookes with his vacuum tube, in a caricature published in the British weekly magazine Vanity Fair in 1903. The caption was: 'Ubi Crookes ibi lux' (Where Crookes is, there is light). British physicist and chemist Sir William Crookes (1832-1919) invented the Crookes tube, a forerunner to the cathode ray tube. Crookes used vacuum tubes to investigate cathode rays in 1878. He discovered that the rays (which were made of electrons) made the sides of the glass tube fluoresce. He also showed that the rays travelled in straight lines and that they could be deflected by a magnetic field. Artwork by Sir Leslie Ward ('Spy').

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Add to board
  • Similar {{ mediaType(i) }}