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Teflon research, 1940s

Teflon research, 1940s

C018/0647

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Credit

HAGLEY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY HAGLEY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Teflon research. Laboratory technician carrying out a test to compare Teflon with another plastic. She has dipped rods of the two plastics in a boiling bath of hot sulphuric acid. One rod (left) has charred and deteriorated. The other, a rod of Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene, right), is not affected by the highly corrosive hot acid. Teflon resists the most corrosive acids and solvents to a degree unequalled by any other plastic. It is not attacked even by aqua regia, which dissolves gold and platinum. Teflon was discovered in 1938 by DuPont researchers. Photographed at the DuPont site in Richmond, Virginia, USA, in around the 1940s.

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