This video is not available for purchase in your country.

How an electron microscope works

K004/3540

Rights Managed

  • {{ default.width }}x{{ default.height }}
  • {{ default.frame_rate }}
  • {{ default.size }}

This video is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

RHYS LEWIS, AHS, DECD, UNISA / EQUINOX GRAPHICS / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY RHYS LEWIS, AHS, DECD, UNISA / EQUINOX GRAPHICS / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Animation of the inside of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), showing how it produces an image. An electron gun at the top of the column produces a beam of fast-moving electrons. These are focused by magnetic lenses , which deflect the negatively-charged electrons. A sample is introduced into the beam, absorbing and interacting with some electrons, and the remainder are focused onto a screen at the bottom. The image from this screen can be displayed on a computer. Electrons are able to image far smaller structures than visible light, as the wavelength of an electron, as described by wave-particle duality, is far smaller than that of visible light.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

Clip Properties:

  • Duration: 00:00:24.01
  • Audio: No
  • Interlaced: No
  • Capture Format: QuickTime Animation
  • Codec: PNG

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Add to board
  • Similar {{ mediaType(i) }}