This video is not available for purchase in your country.

Bioluminescent plankton

K005/3629

Rights Managed

  • {{ default.width }}x{{ default.height }}
  • {{ default.frame_rate }}
  • {{ default.size }}

This video is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

GERD GUENTHER / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY GERD GUENTHER / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Culture of bioluminescent plankton glowing bright blue as it is poured into a round-bottomed flask. This plankton is the tropical marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis noctiluca. It forms huge swarms in warm seas, photosynthesising during the day. At night the swarms produce light when disturbed, through a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule being oxidised by a luciferase enzyme. P. noctiluca produces its luciferin from its chlorophyll. As seen here, it only glows when disturbed: during pouring it glows brightly, but as soon as pouring stops it turns off. This is thought to have evolved as a defensive measure. Some small predators will not eat glowing plankton, as it shines through their transparent bodies and makes them more visible to predators. In addition to this, by revealing the wakes of larger predators, the glowing plankton highlights its predators' positions to their own predators. Cultured at the Culture Collection of Algae at the University of Cologne, Germany.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

Downloadable Master

  • Duration: 00:00:19.08
  • Audio: No
  • Format: Photo JPEG 100% QuickTime movie

Original

  • Capture Format: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

Contact us if you require the original or other formats.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Calculate price
  • Add to board