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Haber process catalysis, animation

K005/6053

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Credit

RHYS LEWIS, AHS, DECD, UNISA / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY RHYS LEWIS, AHS, DECD, UNISA / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Haber process catalysis. Animation showing the catalytic mechanism in the Haber process that produces ammonia (NH3) from nitrogen (N2) and hydrogen (H2) gas. The catalyst used is a metal, usually iron. The animation shows a molecule of nitrogen (dark blue) attaching to the metal surface as two nitrogen atoms. Hydrogen molecules (white) are shown attaching to the surface, breaking apart and attaching to the nitrogen atoms. Once three hydrogen atoms have attached to a nitrogen atom, the resulting molecule of ammonia breaks free from the surface. Ammonia is widely used in the chemical industry to produce other chemicals, particularly fertilisers, and the process seen here is an important method of fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere. This process, also known as the Haber-Bosch process, is named after its inventors Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch.

Release details

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Downloadable Master

  • Duration: 00:00:30.01
  • Audio: No
  • Format: Photo - JPEG

Original

  • Capture Format: QuickTime Animation
  • Codec: Animation
  • Interlaced: No
  • Frame Size: 1920 x 1080

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