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Children Receiving Wages, 1871

Children Receiving Wages, 1871

C030/4302

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41.4 MB (8.9 MB compressed)

4500 x 3219 pixels

38.1 x 27.2 cm ⏐ 15.0 x 10.7 in (300dpi)

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Credit

NYPL / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY NYPL / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Entitled: Children receiving wages for work in Brickyard's, England 1871. Child labour refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful. As early as 1802 and 1819 Factory Acts were passed to regulate the working hours of workhouse children in factories and cotton mills to 12 hours per day. These acts were largely ineffective and after radical agitation, a Royal Commission recommended in 1833 that children aged 11-18 should work a maximum of 12 hours per day, children aged 9-11 a maximum of eight hours, and children under the age of nine were no longer permitted to work. This act however only applied to the textile industry, and further agitation led to another act in 1847 limiting both adults and children to 10 hour working days.

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Model release not required. Property release not required.

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