This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Prohibition Chemist Tests Bootleg Whiskey, 1920

Prohibition Chemist Tests Bootleg Whiskey, 1920

C030/4499

Rights Managed

52.8 MB (2.9 MB compressed)

4800 x 3845 pixels

40.6 x 32.5 cm ⏐ 16.0 x 12.8 in (300dpi)

This image is not available for purchase in your country.

Please contact your Account Manager if you have any query.

Credit

LOC / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY LOC / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Restrictions

Editorial use only.

Caption

Chemist G. F. Beyer of the Internal Revenue Bureau testing bootleg whiskey. Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide Constitutional ban on the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcoholic beverages that remained in place from 1920 to 1933. It was promoted by dry crusaders movement, led by rural Protestants and social Progressives in the Democratic and Republican parties, and was coordinated by the Anti-Saloon League. Prohibition was mandated under the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Enabling legislation, known as the Volstead Act, set down the rules for enforcing the ban and defined the types of alcoholic beverages that were prohibited. Private ownership and consumption of alcohol was not made illegal under federal law; however, in many areas local laws were more strict, with some states banning possession outright. Nationwide Prohibition ended with the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which.

Release details

Model release not available. Property release not required.

 {{ i.shot_duration ? i.shot_duration + ' ' : '' }}{{ i.shot_uhd ? '4K ' : i.hires ? 'HD ' : '' }}{{ i.spl_number }} R{{ i.license }}

  • Calculate price
  • Add to board