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Circus Maximus procession, 16th-century illustration

Circus Maximus procession, 16th-century illustration

C038/4880

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Credit

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, MUSIC DIVISION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, MUSIC DIVISION / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Circus Maximus procession, 16th-century illustration. The Circus Maximus was the largest chariot racetrack in ancient Rome. It was 620 metres long, 120 metres wide, and could hold around 150,000 spectators. It was also a public space, used for religious processions and for markets when no races were being held. Here, various groups (annotated in Latin) are forming a procession. The groups shown (from top right) include Roman senators, magistrates, lictors (bodyguards), priests, vestel virgins, augurs, flamines (priests), pontifices (priests), and numerous other groups, including horse-drawn chariots and religious objects. This illustration was from a book by Italian historian and antiquary Onofrio Panvinio (1529-1568) that was published posthumously.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

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