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Sulfur trioxide molecule non-polarity

K008/0144

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Credit

JON BAUGH / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY JON BAUGH / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Animation of a model of a molecule of sulfur trioxide (SO3), showing its electrostatic potential surface as a coloured layer above the atoms. Sulfur trioxide is a symmetrical molecule with three oxygen atoms (red) arranged in a planar equilateral triangle around a central sulfur atom (yellow). As the molecule is perfectly symmetrical, it has no dipole moment and is not polar. Compare this with the ammonia molecule in clip K004/3634. Here, red areas have a slight negative charge, blue areas a slight positive charge. This arises as the oxygen atoms are more electronegative than the sulfur atom, so attract negatively-charged electrons more strongly.

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Model release not required. Property release not required.

Clip Properties:

  • Duration: 00:00:10.01
  • Audio: No
  • Interlaced: No
  • Capture Format: QuickTime Animation
  • Codec: Apple ProRes 4444

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