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Two Enigma Rotors and Spindle

Two Enigma Rotors and Spindle

C043/4613

Rights Managed

19.7 MB (1.4 MB compressed)

3600 x 1909 pixels

30.5 x 16.3 cm ⏐ 12.0 x 6.4 in (300dpi)

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Credit

SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

Two Enigma rotors and the spindle on which they are mounted. When the machine is assembled, the spring-loaded studs on the right hand side of rotor (pictured left), make electrical contact with the brass contacts on the left hand side of the rotor (pictured right). The rotor to the left shows the tooth-edged rachet of the stepping mechanism. The notch adjacent to the letter 'D' on the rotor to the right, allows the pawl of the stepping mechanism to fall into place to advance the rotor to its left. The Enigma machines were a series of electro-mechanical rotor cipher machines developed and used in the early-to mid-20th century to protect commercial, diplomatic and military communication. Enigma was invented by the German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. Alan Turing was a key player in cracking the Enigma code at Bletchley Park in the UK.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

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