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How Cells Take in Glucose

How Cells Take in Glucose

C043/6330

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25.9 MB (924.0 KB compressed)

3720 x 2437 pixels

31.5 x 20.6 cm ⏐ 12.4 x 8.1 in (300dpi)

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Credit

THEVISUALMD / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY THEVISUALMD / SCIENCE SOURCE / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption

In a healthy body, the pancreatic hormones insulin and glucagon perform their back-and-forth dance perfectly, and blood sugar level stays in its normal, narrow range. But in type 2 diabetes, this careful balance is upset. Type 2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), used to be called adult-onset diabetes because it almost never developed in children. Now, though, a frightening number of cases develop in young people. This image shows how insulin sends a signal to glucose receptors in the cell membrane, telling them to admit glucose. In type 2 diabetes, something goes wrong with this very complex signalling pathway.

Release details

Model release not required. Property release not required.

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